Obesity and Heart Disease

Fact. Approximately, 2.4 million Canadians are living with heart disease according to the Minister of Health in a recent statement bringing awareness to this year’s Heart Month.

Fact. Adults between the ages of 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese, have a significantly increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, compared to adults with a normal BMI, according to a study published last April in the JAMA Cardiology medical journal.

Fact. Carrying excess pounds strains the entire circulatory system, which not only pushes your heart to work harder, but also increases your risk in developing other cardiovascular diseases.

In honor of Heart month, we explain the correlation between obesity & heart disease and its connection to the development of other chronic diseases such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and Type 2 Diabetes.

It’s no surprise that a person living with obesity has a higher risk of developing heart disease. Having a larger waist circumference is often linked to increased inflammation in the body which increases your risk of having coronary artery disease. According to cardiologist, Dr. Tracy Stevens at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, “high blood pressure brought on by obesity irritates plaque in the arteries and predisposes it to rupturing, triggering a heart attack. Losing weight will reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly because it makes a difference in blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride levels.”

For almost 15 years, many patients at the SmartShape Weight Loss Centre, have had such success in putting their diabetes into remission and are no longer required to take some of their medications, due to significant weight loss achieved. In July 2017, Mary-Ann had the Mini Gastric Bypass with one of our renowned bariatric surgeons in Toronto. After 9 months, Mary-Ann lost 165 lbs and no longer takes medication for high blood pressure and cholesterol, in addition to no longer being insulin dependent. “I secured an additional 20 – 25 years more of life.”

Read more about Mary-Ann’s accomplishments and how she reduced her chances of living with heart disease.

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